The Role of a Neuropsychological Assessment
in Supporting Children with Hydrocephalus
(French edition follows)

Andrea Downie, PhD., C. Psych, Clinical Neurpsychologist, Children’s Hospital London Health Sciences Centre & Independent Private Practice Neuropsychologist, dr.andreadownie@gmail.com  and
Isabelle Montourproux PhD, Independent Private Practice Neuropsychologist drimontourproulx@evaluationneuropsy.com

Hydrocephalus occurs when the ventricles (i.e., cavities within the brain that are filled with cerebral spinal fluid, CSF), become abnormally enlarged due to a problem in either the formation, flow or reabsorption of CSF. This results in a build up of CSF in the ventricles causing pressure on the surrounding brain structures. Hydrocephalus occurs as a complication of a number of neurodevelopmental disorders and may damage or change the way brain structures develop. For example, hydrocephalus can be present from birth, as seen in children with spina bifida and aqueduct stenosis. It can also develop later, sometimes seen in children who have been diagnosed with a brain tumour.

Cognitive and Academic Challenges Associated with Hydrocephalus
Children diagnosed with hydrocephalus are at risk to experience a number of cognitive and academic difficulties that can develop over time. The extent and nature of these difficulties vary considerably and are probably influenced by a number of factors including the neurodevelopmental disorder associated with the hydrocephalus. These difficulties may not always be obvious when children are very young and may develop as children get older as school and academic demands become more complex. A number of studies have documented that children with hydrocephalus can experience difficulty in the following areas:

  • Intelligence. Intellectual skills may develop more slowly in children with hydrocephalus than their peers, and the different types of skills that make up intelligence may develop unevenly. For example, verbal reasoning/intelligence (e.g., the ability to use language to reason with abstract concepts, or demonstrate vocabulary knowledge) may be stronger than nonverbal reasoning/intelligence with visuospatial analysis skills (e.g., the ability to analyse and mentally manipulate objects or shapes, and to understand the relations between them) being particularly impaired in children with hydrocephalus.
  • Language. Although children with hydrocephalus generally have age appropriate vocabulary and grammar, they can experience difficulty understanding language that is not literal, such as the ability to make inferences from spoken and written language, or understand ambiguous sentences (e.g., We saw her duck) and idioms (e.g., I’m all ears).
  • Memory. Difficulties with memory involving the ability to learn and retain both verbal and visual information can also be observed.
  • Processing speed, or how fast a child is able to take in, process and respond to information is also shown to be influenced by hydrocephalus. This can affect how quickly a child is able to respond to a question in class, or how quickly they can copy information from the board in the classroom.
  • Motor skills, including those allowing a child to manipulate objects with the hands, may also be weaker in children with hydrocephalus, and can interfere with the development of handwriting and drawing.
  • Executive Functioning Skills. Hydrocephalus can also influence the development of executive functioning skills, often thought as “a manager” in the brain, that co-ordinates several mental actions, such as inhibition, impulse control, attention, working memory (e.g., the capacity to hold information in mind and to manipulate it), planning and organization, for the purpose of solving a problem or completing a task. Executive function also plays a role in emotional and behavioural control (often referred to as self-regulation).
  • Academic Skills. The cognitive problems described above may have an impact on a child’s ability to learn academic skills and often result in learning difficulties that can manifest as poor reading comprehension, spelling and writing skills. In some children, particularly those whose hydrocephalus is associated with spina bifida, math is a challenging academic subject.

When to Consider a Neuropsychological Assessment?
Not all children who experience hydrocephalus will go on to develop difficulties in the skills described above. Early signs that a child may be having difficulty in one or more cognitive or academic skills is often communicated to parents by classroom teachers. For example, a child may take more time to complete written work, have difficulty keeping up with the pace of the classroom, have trouble following multi-step instructions, require considerable prompting to stay on task, and have difficulty making sense of visual representations of concepts. Parents may also notice difficulty when homework takes more time than it should, when their child avoids homework, or becomes upset when completing it.

In the school setting, children with learning problems are often evaluated by school or clinical psychologists. These psychoeducational assessments focus primarily on a child’s academic achievement and overall functioning at school. For some children, particularly those with medical conditions that affect the development of the brain, learning problems can also be evaluated by neuropsychologists. These neuropsychological assessments are particularly comprehensive, evaluating different types of cognitive skills such as intelligence, language, memory, visual-motor integration, executive functioning (including attention and working memory), and academic achievement. Assessment of adaptive functioning, behaviour, and emotional well-being is also completed. Neuropsychologists have specialized knowledge about the way medical conditions affect brain development and the pattern of cognitive and academic strengths and weaknesses associated with these conditions. Assessment results are interpreted in the context of the child’s neurological or medical history, which serves to gain a better understanding of why a child is having difficulty learning and the supports that they require to be successful at school and in their day-to-day activities. Like a psychoeducational assessment, neuropsychological assessments can also be used to help a child’s school determine an appropriate classroom placement. Sometimes this can be formalized by a school board as an Individual Education Plan (IEP), which outlines a child’s strengths and weaknesses and the supports that they require in the classroom.

Transitioning to Post-Secondary Education and Workplace
Depending on the medical condition associated with hydrocephalus and the treatments available, hydrocephalus can remain a life-long condition in many individuals. For these individuals, this may involve changes in their profile of cognitive and academic strengths and weaknesses over time. Transitioning to post-secondary education and/or the workplace, reaching independent adulthood, and maximizing quality of life may also be challenging. Studies have shown that memory, attention, motor skills and speed, as well as several aspects of executive functioning (particularly generating effective strategies to complete tasks and multi-tasking) appear to continue to represent challenges during adulthood. The extent to which individuals with hydrocephalus are able to develop and master academic-related skills, such as reading comprehension and mathematical computation and problem solving, also play a role in their personal, social, work and community aspects of living. Neuropsychological assessment at the time of transition from high school can help make adjustments in expectations/goals in different areas of adult living, and identify supports that might be needed at home, in the workplace and/or in the community. Neuropsychologists are professionals that remain an important source of knowledge and support throughout the lives of those for whom hydrocephalus constitutes a life-long condition.

 

Bibliography

Anderson, V., Northam, E., & Wrennall, J. (2019). Structural Disorders of the Brain. In Developmental neuropsychology: a clinical approach (pp. 160–215). Routledge.

Dennis, M., & Fletcher, J. (2010). Spina Bifida & Hydrocephalus. In K. O. Yeates, M. D. Ris, H. G. Taylor, & B. F. Pennington (Eds.), Paediatric Neuropsychology – Research, Theory, and Practice (2nd ed., pp. 3-25). The Guilford Press.

Grant, C., Iddon, J., Talbot, E., Vella, K., & Starza-Smith, A. (2009). The Neuropsychological Consequences of Hydrocephalus. Cerebrospinal Fluid Disorders, 121–130. https://doi.org/10.3109/9781420016284-6

Kahle, K. T., Kulkarni, A. V., Limbrick Jr, D. D., & Warf, B. C. (2016). Hydrocephalus in Children. Lancet, 387, 788–799. https://doi.org/http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ S0140-6736(15)60694-8

Paulsen, A. H., Lundar, T., & Lindegaard, K.-F. (2015). Pediatric hydrocephalus: 40-year outcomes in 128 hydrocephalic patients treated with shunts during childhood. Assessment of surgical outcome, work participation, and health-related quality of life. Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, 16(6), 633–641. https://doi.org/10.3171/2015.5.peds14532

Silver, C., Blackburn, L., Arffa, S., Barth, J., Bush, S., Koffler, S.P., Pliskin, N.H., Reynolds, C.R., Ruff, R.M., Troster, A.I., Moser, R.S., & Elliott, Robert W. (2006). The importance of neuropsychological assessment for the evaluation of childhood learning disorders. NAN Policy and Planning Committee. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 21(7), 741-744. doi:10.1016/j.acn.2006.08.006

 

________________________________________________________________

 

L’évaluation neuropsychologique comme outil de soutien aux enfants qui vivent avec l’hydrocéphalie

 

Isabelle Montour-Proulx, PhD, Neuropsychologue, Pratique privée indépendante drimontourproulx@evaluationneuropsy.com

Andrea Downie, PhD., C. Psych, Neuropsychologue clinicienne, Children’s Hospital London Health Sciences Centre & Pratique privée indépendante  dr.andreadownie@gmail.com

L’hydrocéphalie se développe lorsque les ventricules (i.e., cavités à l’intérieur du cerveau qui contiennent le liquide céphalo-rachidien, LCR) s’élargissent de façon anormale en raison d’un problème qui survient soit dans la formation, la circulation ou la réabsorption du LCR.  Il en résulte une accumulation de LCR dans les ventricules qui produit une pression surélevée sur les structures du cerveau avoisinantes.  L’hydrocéphalie est une complication liée à différents troubles neurodéveloppementaux, et peut avoir pour effet d’endommager les structures du cerveau ou de modifier la façon dont elles se développent.  Par exemple, l’hydrocéphalie peut être présente dès la naissance, tel qu’il est le cas chez les enfants qui ont le spina-bifida et une sténose de l’aqueduc de Sylvius.  Elle peut aussi se développer plus tard, lorsqu’une maladie telle un cancer du cerveau (tumeur cérébrale) survient.

Les difficultés cognitives et académiques associées à l’hydrocéphalie
Les enfants chez qui une hydrocéphalie est diagnostiquée sont à risque d’éprouver certaines difficultés cognitives et académiques qui peuvent se développer au fil des ans.  La sévérité et la nature de ces difficultés varient grandement et sont probablement influencées par divers facteurs dont le trouble neurodéveloppemental associé à l’hydrocéphalie.  Il arrive que ces difficultés ne soient pas apparentes lorsque les enfants sont très jeunes, et qu’elles se manifestent graduellement au fur et à mesure qu’ils vieillissent alors que les exigences aux plans scolaire et académique s’intensifient.  Un certain nombre d’études ont démontré que les enfants vivant avec l’hydrocéphalie peuvent éprouver des difficultés dans les domaines suivants :

  • Les habiletés intellectuelles des enfants qui vivent avec l’hydrocéphalie peuvent se développer plus lentement comparativement à celles des enfants qui n’ont pas une telle condition.  De plus, les différents types d’habiletés qui contribuent à l’intelligence peuvent se développer de façon inégale.  Par exemple, l’intelligence/le raisonnement verbal (i.e., utiliser le langage afin de raisonner à partir de concepts abstraits ou démontrer sa maîtrise du vocabulaire) peut se développer davantage que l’intelligence/le raisonnement non verbal; l’analyse visuospatiale (i.e., habileté permettant l’analyse et la manipulation mentale d’objets ou de formes, et la compréhension des relations entre ces objets ou ces formes) est particulièrement atteinte chez les enfants qui vivent avec une hydrocéphalie.
  • Bien que de façon générale les enfants qui vivent avec l’hydrocéphalie aient un vocabulaire et une maîtrise de la grammaire appropriés pour leur âge, ils peuvent manifester des difficultés à comprendre le langage qui n’est pas littéral, de telle sorte qu’ils peinent, par exemple, à tirer des inférences à partir de ce qui leur est dit ou de ce qu’ils lisent, ou à comprendre les phrases ambigües et les idiomes (ex : Je suis toute ouïe; S’enfarger dans les fleurs du tapis).
  • Mémoire. Des difficultés de mémoire impliquant l’habileté à apprendre et à retenir les informations verbales et visuelles peuvent aussi être apparentes.
  • Vitesse de traitement de l’information, ou la rapidité avec laquelle l’enfant peut percevoir une information, la traiter et y répondre, est aussi affectée par l’hydrocéphalie. Ceci peut avoir un impact sur la rapidité avec laquelle l’enfant arrive à répondre à une question qui lui est adressée en classe, ou sur la vitesse à laquelle il peut copier des informations inscrites au tableau.
  • Motricité. Les habiletés motrices, incluant celles permettant de manipuler des objets avec les mains, peuvent aussi être plus pauvres chez les enfants qui vivent avec l’hydrocéphalie.  Ceci peut interférer de façon négative avec le développement des habiletés nécessaires à la calligraphie (i.e., formation des lettres à l’écrit) et au dessin.
  • Fonctionnement exécutif. L’hydrocéphalie peut entraver le développement des habiletés permettant le fonctionnement exécutif, auquel on réfère souvent comme étant le « chef d’orchestre » du cerveau; il coordonne plusieurs processus mentaux tels l’inhibition, le contrôle de l’impulsivité, l’attention, la mémoire de travail (i.e., la capacité à maintenir des informations en tête et à les manipuler), la planification et l’organisation.  Cette coordination a pour but de permettre la résolution de problèmes ou de compléter une tâche.  De plus, le fonctionnement exécutif joue un rôle dans le contrôle émotionnel et comportemental (souvent nommé auto-régulation).
  • Habiletés académiques. Les problèmes cognitifs décrits ci-haut peuvent avoir un impact sur la capacité de l’enfant à développer les habiletés académiques, ce qui souvent engendre des difficultés d’apprentissage qui peuvent se manifester par une pauvre compréhension de la lecture ainsi qu’une faible maîtrise de l’orthographe et de l’expression écrite.  Pour certains enfants, particulièrement ceux chez qui l’hydrocéphalie est associée au spina-bifida, les mathématiques posent un défi dans leur parcours académique.

Quand devrait-on envisager une évaluation neuropsychologique?
Ce ne sont pas tous les enfants vivant avec l’hydrocéphalie qui développent les difficultés décrites plus haut.  Les premiers signes indiquant qu’un enfant puisse éprouver des difficultés dans un ou plusieurs domaines cognitifs ou académiques sont souvent communiqués aux parents par l’enseignant(e).  Par exemple, un enfant peut prendre davantage de temps pour terminer un travail écrit, éprouver de la difficulté à suivre le rythme de la classe, ne pas bien suivre les consignes qui contiennent plusieurs étapes, nécessiter plusieurs rappels afin de demeurer centré sur la tâche à accomplir, ou avoir de la difficulté à saisir la signification de la représentation visuelle de certains concepts.  Les parents peuvent détecter la présence de difficultés chez leur enfant lorsque celui-ci prend plus de temps à faire ses devoirs qu’il ne le devrait, qu’il évite les devoirs ou devient contrarié lorsqu’il les fait.

À l’école, les enfants qui éprouvent des problèmes d’apprentissage sont souvent évalués par des psychologues scolaires ou cliniciens.  Leurs évaluations psychoéducationnelles sont surtout centrées sur le rendement académique de l’enfant ainsi que sur son fonctionnement général en milieu scolaire.  En ce qui concerne certains enfants, notamment ceux chez qui une condition médicale affecte le développement du cerveau, leurs problèmes d’apprentissage peuvent aussi être évalués par des neuropsychologues.  Leurs évaluations neuropsychologiques sont particulièrement exhaustives, plusieurs types d’habiletés cognitives étant évaluées, telles l’intelligence, le langage, la mémoire, l’intégration visuo-motrice, le fonctionnement exécutif (incluant l’attention et la mémoire de travail), ainsi que le rendement académique.  L’évaluation du fonctionnement adaptatif, du comportement et du bien-être émotionnel de l’enfant est aussi effectuée.  Les neuropsychologues acquièrent des connaissances spécialisées concernant la façon dont les conditions médicales affectent le développement du cerveau, ainsi qu’à propos du profil de forces et de faiblesses cognitives et académiques associé à ces conditions.  Les résultats de l’évaluation sont interprétés en fonction de l’histoire neurologique ou médicale de l’enfant, ce qui permet de mieux comprendre pourquoi il/elle éprouve des difficultés d’apprentissage, et d’identifier les ressources dont il/elle a besoin afin de réussir à l’école et d’accomplir les activités de la vie quotidienne.  Tout comme une évaluation psychoéducationnelle, l’évaluation neuropsychologique peut aussi être utilisée afin d’aider les intervenants de l’équipe-école à déterminer le classement ou placement scolaire approprié pour l’enfant.  Ceci est parfois formalisé par l’équipe-école en procédant à la rédaction d’un Plan d’intervention (PI) qui décrit les forces et les faiblesses de l’enfant, ainsi que les moyens qui seront pris afin de le soutenir en classe.

La transition aux études post-secondaires et en milieu de travail
Tout dépendant de la condition médicale associée à l’hydrocéphalie et des traitements qui sont disponibles, pour plusieurs individus l’hydrocéphalie peut demeurer présente tout au long de leur vie.  Chez eux, des changements peuvent se produire au fil du temps dans leur profil de forces et de faiblesses cognitives et académiques.  Passer aux études post-secondaires et/ou au milieu de travail, devenir un adulte autonome, et maximiser la qualité de vie peut représenter un défi particulier pour ces personnes.  Les études ont démontré que la mémoire, l’attention, les habiletés et la vitesse motrices, ainsi que plusieurs aspects du fonctionnement exécutif (notamment les capacités à générer des stratégies efficaces afin de compléter les tâches et à effectuer plusieurs tâches à la fois) semblent continuer à poser défis tout au long de la vie adulte.  La mesure dans laquelle ces personnes pourront développer et maîtriser les habiletés liées à la réussite scolaire, telles la compréhension de la lecture, les opérations mathématiques et la résolution de problèmes, influencera plusieurs aspects de leur vie, notamment aux plans personnel, social, communautaire et du travail.  Procéder à une évaluation neuropsychologique au moment du passage de l’éducation secondaire à la vie adulte peut permettre d’ajuster les attentes et les buts concernant divers domaines de la vie adulte, et d’identifier les moyens de soutien dont l’individu aura besoin à la maison, dans son milieu de travail ainsi que dans sa communauté.  Les neuropsychologues demeurent une source importante de connaissances et de soutien tout au long de la vie de ceux chez qui l’hydrocéphalie est une condition permanente.  

 

Bibliographie
Anderson, V., Northam, E., & Wrennall, J. (2019). Structural Disorders of the Brain. In Developmental neuropsychology: a clinical approach (pp. 160–215). Routledge.

Dennis, M., & Fletcher, J. (2010). Spina Bifida & Hydrocephalus. In K. O. Yeates, M. D. Ris, H. G. Taylor, & B. F. Pennington (Eds.), Paediatric Neuropsychology – Research, Theory, and Practice (2nd ed., pp. 3-25). The Guilford Press.

Grant, C., Iddon, J., Talbot, E., Vella, K., & Starza-Smith, A. (2009). The Neuropsychological Consequences of Hydrocephalus. Cerebrospinal Fluid Disorders, 121–130. https://doi.org/10.3109/9781420016284-6

Kahle, K. T., Kulkarni, A. V., Limbrick Jr, D. D., & Warf, B. C. (2016). Hydrocephalus in Children. Lancet, 387, 788–799. https://doi.org/http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ S0140-6736(15)60694-8

Paulsen, A. H., Lundar, T., & Lindegaard, K.-F. (2015). Pediatric hydrocephalus: 40-year outcomes in 128 hydrocephalic patients treated with shunts during childhood. Assessment of surgical outcome, work participation, and health-related quality of life. Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, 16(6), 633–641. https://doi.org/10.3171/2015.5.peds14532

Silver, C., Blackburn, L., Arffa, S., Barth, J., Bush, S., Koffler, S.P., Pliskin, N.H., Reynolds, C.R., Ruff, R.M., Troster, A.I., Moser, R.S., & Elliott, Robert W. (2006). The importance of neuropsychological assessment for the evaluation of childhood learning disorders. NAN Policy and Planning Committee. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 21(7), 741-744. doi:10.1016/j.acn.2006.08.006